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This is a list of stars. enjoy

List of stars
Star name Solar radii
(Sun = 1)
Method Notes
VY Canis Majoris (1,800 -) 2,200[1][2] L/Teff Humphreys et al estimate. The largest star known,[3] assuming that the largest parameter of Westerlund 1-26 is not correct.
Orbit of Saturn 1,940 - 2,169 Reported for reference
VV Cephei A (1,600[4][5]–) 1,900[4]Template:Efn VV Cep A is a highly distorted star in a close binary system, losing mass to the secondary for at least part of its orbit.
MY Cephei 1,750[6] - 2,440[7] L/Teff Radii made using the Stefan-Boltzmann law.
NML Cygni 1,650
WOH G64 1,540[8] L/Teff The largest star in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
RW Cephei 1,535[9][10]
VX Sagittarii 1,520[11] - 1,550[12]
RSGC1-F02 1,498[13]
RSGC1-F01 1,435[13]
KY Cygni 1,420[4]
Mu Cephei 1,420 AD
HR 5171 A 1,315 ± 260[14] AD HR 5171 A is a highly distorted star in a close binary system, losing mass to the secondary, and is also variable in temperature, thus probably also in diameter. Traditionally, it is considered the largest known yellow hypergiant.
SMC 18136 1,310[15] This would be the largest star in the SMC.
J004424.94+412322.3 1,300[16] L/Teff The largest star in the Andromeda Galaxy.
LMC 136042 1,240[15]
BI Cygni 1,240[4] L/Teff
Westerlund 1-237 1,233[17]
SMC 5092 1,220[15]
S Persei 1,230[4] AD & L/Teff A red hypergiant localed in the Perseus Double Cluster.
LMC 175464 1,200[15]
LMC 135720 1,200[15]
RAFGL 2139 1,200[18] RAFGL 2139 is a rare red supergiant companion to WR 114 that has a bow shock.
PZ Cassiopeiae 1,190[4] L/Teff
SMC 69886 1,190[15]
Pistol Star 1,180Template:Citation needed
RSGC1-F05 1,177[13] L/Teff
RSGC1-F03 1,168[13]
LMC 119219 1,150[15]
RSGC1-F08 1,146[13]
BC Cygni 1,140[4]-1,230[19] Other recent estimates range from Template:Solar radius to Template:Solar radius.[20]
LBV 1806-20 1,135
SMC 10889 1,130[15]
LMC 141430 1,110[15]
LMC 175746 1,100[15]
RSGC1-F13 1,098[13]
RT Carinae 1,090[4]
RSGC1-F04 1,082[13]
LMC 174714 1,080[15]
LMC 68125 1,080[15]
SMC 49478 1,080[15]
SMC 20133 1,080[15]
V396 Centauri 1,070[4]
SMC 8930 1,070[15]
Orbit of Jupiter 1,064–1,173 Reported for reference
HV 11423 1,060–1,220[21] L/Teff HV 11423 is variable in spectral type (observed from K0 to M5), thus probably also in diameter. In October 1978, it was a star of M0I type.
CK Carinae 1,060[4]
SMC 25879 1,060[15]
LMC 142202 1,050[15]
LMC 146126 1,050[15]
LMC 67982 1,040[15]
U Lacertae 1,022[11] L/Teff
RSGC1-F11 1,015[13]
LMC 143877 1,010[15]
KW Sagittarii 1,009[22]-1,460[4] AD & L/Teff
SMC 46497 990[15]
LMC 140296 990[15]
RSGC1-F09 986[13] L/Teff
NR Vulpeculae 980[4]
SMC 12322 980[15]
LMC 177997 980[15]
SMC 59803 970[15]
GCIRS 7 960 ± 92[23] AD
Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) 950[24] (887 ± 203 - 1,200) The second brightest star in the Orion constellation and the 9th brightest overall.
SMC 50840 950[15]
RSGC1-F10 931[13] L/Teff
S Cassiopeiae 930[25][26]
IX Carinae 920[4]
HV 2112 916[27] Most likely candidate for a Thorne-Zytkow Object. Calculated with the Stefan-Boltzmann Law.
UY Scuti 916
RSGC1-F07 910[13]
LMC 54365 900[15]
NSV 25875 891[28]
LMC 109106 890[15]
RSGC1-F06 885[13]
LMC 116895 880[15]
SMC 30616 880[15]
LMC 64048 880[15]
V437 Scuti 874[28]
V602 Carinae 860[4]-1,050[29] L/Teff & AD
V669 Cassiopeiae 859[28] L/Teff
SMC 55681 850[15]
SMC 15510 850[15]
LMC 61753 830[15]
LMC 62090 830[15]
SMC 11709 830[15]
V1185 Scorpii 830[28] L/Teff
Outer limits of the asteroid belt 816 Reported for reference
LMC 142199 810[15]
Eta Carinae A (Tseen She) 800[30] Previously thought to be the most massive single star, but in 2005 it was realized to be a binary system. During the Great Eruption, it was Template:Solar radius.[31] Older estimates gives Template:Solar radius.[32]
Antares A (Alpha Scorpii A) 800[33] (varies by 165)[34] The brightest star in the Scorpius constellation and the 15th brightest overall.
LMC 134383 800[15]
BO Carinae 790[4] L/Teff
LMC 142907 790[15]
SU Persei 780[4] All in the Perseus Double Cluster.
RS Persei 770[35]-1,000[4] AD & L/Teff
AV Persei 770[4] L/Teff
V355 Cepheus 770[4]
V915 Scorpii 760[36]
S Cephei 760[37]
SMC 11939 750[15]
HD 303250 750[4]
V382 Carinae 747[38] The brightest yellow hypergiant in the night sky, one of the rarest types of star. Achmad (1992) calculates Template:Solar radius.[39]
RU Virginis 742[37]
LMC 137818 740[15]
SMC 48122 740[15]
SMC 56732 730[15]
V648 Cassiopeiae 710[4] L/Teff
TV Geminorum 620-710[40] (–770)[4]
HD 179821 704[41]
LMC 169754 700[15]
LMC 65558 700[15]
V528 Carinae 700[4] L/Teff
The following well-known stars are listed for the purpose of comparison.
Pi1 Gruis 694[42] Pi1 Gruis is a red giant with giant convention loops on its surface.[43]
V354 Cephei 690[11]-1,520[4]
119 Tauri 587[44]-608[45] Can be occulted (blocked out of view) by the Moon, allowing accurate determination of its apparent diameter.
Solar System's Habitable Zone 557.9 (mean)[46][47][48][49] Reported for reference
S Pegasi 580[50]
W Hydrae 562[51]
T Cephei 540[52]
S Orionis 530[53]
R Cassiopeiae 500[54]
R Leporis 500
R Andromedae 485 ± 125
Chi Cygni 470[55]
Alpha Herculis (Ras Algethi) 460
R Hydrae 460
Rho Cassiopeiae 450
Tail of Comet Hyakutake 360 Reported for reference
Mira A (Omicron Ceti) 400[56]
V509 Cassiopeiae 400[57]–900[58]
S Doradus 100–380[59]
U Orionis 370±96
R Doradus 370
HR Carinae 350
R Leonis 350[60]
V337 Carinae 350
S Coronae Borealis 340
V381 Cephei 327
Orbit of Mars 297 - 358 Reported for reference
Pi Puppis (Ahadi) 290
Psi Aurigae 271
CW Leonis 250
Cygnus OB2-12 244
Omicron1 Canis Majoris 231
La Superba (Y Canum Venaticorum) 215
Delta Canis Majoris (Wezen) 215±66[61]
Orbit of Earth 211 - 219 Reported for reference
V810 Centauri 210
Zeta Aurigae (Haedus) 200
Delta2 Lyrae 200
Lambda Velorum 200
RS Puppis 200
Eta Carinae 85–195[62] Previously thought to be the most massive single star, but in 2005 it was realised to be a binary system
Epsilon Pegasi (Enif) 185
L Carinae 179
6 Cassiopeiae 170
Rho Persei 164
Orbit of Venus 154 - 157 Reported for reference
Epsilon Carinae 153
Gamma Cygni (Sadir) 150
LBV 1806-20 150
Epsilon Geminorum (Mebsuta) 150
Epsilon Aurigae A (Almaaz) 135
Mu Boötis (Alkalurops) 130
66 Andromedae 130
QS Aquilae 130
NO Aurigae 130
56 Aquilae 130
L Puppis 126
Iota Scorpii 125
Delta Apodis 125
HIP 110307 124.1
32 G. Hydrae 121.7
Iota Carinae 120
Xi Puppis (Asmidiske) 120
Mu Sagittarii 115
Omicron Cygni 115
Deneb 114 - 203
V533 Carinae (VV Storm) 114
Gamma Crucis (Gacrux) 113[63]
Zeta Cephei 110
Gamma Aquilae (Tarazed) 110
34 Boötis 110
Beta Arae 110
Atria (Alpha Trianguli Australis) 109
Peony Nebula Star 100
Orbit of Mercury 66 - 100 Reported for reference
Beta Pegasi (Scheat) 95
17 Camelopardalis 91.3
Beta Andromedae (Mirach) 90
R Scuti 87.4
Nu Cephei 83.5
Gamma Andromedae 83
Theta Herculis 80
Var 83 80
Rigel (Beta Orionis) 78
Alpha Leporis (Arneb) 77
P Cygni 76
Beta Doradus 76
DL Crucis 75-80
Pi Herculis 72
13 Boötis 71
R Leporis 70.4
62 Sagittarii 70
Nu Aquilae 66
R Coronae Borealis 65
Canopus (Alpha Carinae) 65
Delta Virginis (Auva) 65
Delta Sagittarii 62
Alpha Persei (Mirfak) 60
Zeta Geminorum (Mekbuda) 60
Eta Aquilae (Bezek) 60
89 Herculis 60
Upsilon Sagittarii 60
Alpha Aquarii (Sadalmelik) 60
CPD -572874 60
Chi Orionis 59
Alpha Persei (Mirfak) 56
Iota Aurigae (Al Kab) 55
FF Aquilae 55
Alpha Apodis 55
Tau Serpentis 54
Beta Cancri (Tarf) 53
Alpha Antliae 53
Zeta¹ Scorpii 52
Alphard (Alpha Hydrae) 50.5
Gamma Draconis (Eltanin) 50
Beta Aquarii (Sadalsuud) 50
HD 5980 A 48-160
Epsilon Boötis (Izar) 48
Zeta² Scorpii 48
AG Antliae 47
V428 Andromedae 46.3
HD 13189 46
HD 203857 46
Aldebaran (Alpha Tauri) 44.2[64]
Polaris (Alpha Ursae Minoris) 43.9
Alpha Cassiopeiae (Schedar) 42
Alpha Ceti (Menkar) 42
Delta Cephei (Alrediph) 41.6
Beta Ursae Minoris (Kochab) 41
Beta Draconis (Rastaban) 40
BD Camelopardalis 40
HD 5980 B 40
Eta Canis Majoris (Aludra) 37.8
87 Leonis 37
Gamma Centauri (Muhlifan) 36.5
S Normae 35.6
R136a1 35.4 Also on record as the most massive and luminous star known.
Sher 25 35
Gamma Leonis (Algieba) 31.9
Alpha Camelopardalis 31.2
Alpha Ursae Majoris (Dubhe) 30
11 Lacertae 30
Beta Camelopardalis 30
Cygnus OB2-8 28
Eta Leonis 27
QPM-241 (Archen Star) 27
R Apodis 26.3
Epsilon Orionis (Alnilam) 26
Eta Piscium 26
Melnick 42 26
Arcturus (Alpha Boötis) 25.4
HD 93129A 25
11 Ursae Minoris 24.1
HD 47536 23.5
Epsilon Leonis (Algenubi) 23
42 Draconis 22 ± 1
Alpha Reticuli 21
Chi Virginis 20.9
19 Cephei 20–30
HDE226868 20-22 The supergiant companion of Cygnus X-1
Zeta Orionis (Alnitak) 20
Theta Scorpii (Sargas) 20
Beta Herculis (Kornephoros) 20
Theta Apodis 20
Alpha Sagittae 20
Westerlund 2 19.3
HR 2422 Monocerotis (Plaskett's Star) 19.2
Kappa Cassiopeiae 19
Beta Scorpii (Acrab) 19
Beta Lyrae (Sheliak) 19
Zeta Puppis (Naos) 18.6
R 122 18.5
HD 93250 18
Alpha Microscopii 17.5
LH45-425 A 17.5
Upsilon Hydrae 17.1
Beta Ceti (Deneb Kaitos) 17
Epsilon Canis Majoris (Adhara) 17
LY Aurigae 16
Theta Centauri (Menkent) 16
Beta Corvi (Kraz) 16
Beta Cygni A1 (Albireo) 16
Delta Orionis A (Mintaka) 15.8
Nu Ophiuchi (Sinistra) 15.25
Alpha Arietis (Hamal) 15
Gamma Cassiopeiae (Tsih) 14
Beta Ophiuchi 13.2
37 Aquilae 13
HD 240210 13
Alpha Aurigae A (Capella A) 12.2
Xi Aquilae 12
Gamma Arae 12
Gamma Sagittarii (Alnasl) 11
LH45-425 B 10
VV Cephei B 13[5]-25[65] The B-type main sequence companion of VV Cephei A.
WR 104 10 Located 8,000 light years away from us, this star could destroy life on Earth with its self-destructive supernova.[66]
Sun 1 The largest object in the Solar System.
Reported for reference
  1. bibcode=2006astro.ph.10433H
  2. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named largest
  3. https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/abs/2013/11/aa21683-13/aa21683-13.html
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19 4.20 4.21 4.22 4.23 Table 4 in https://doi.org/10.1086%2F430901
  5. 5.0 5.1 Template:Cite journal
  6. Calculated using the luminosity and effective temperature, using sources http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-iarticle_query?1994ApJS...93..187B&data_type=PDF_HIGH&whole_paper=YES&type=PRINTER&filetype=.pdf and https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201219078
  7. Calculated using the luminosity and effective temperature, using https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201219078https://doi.org/10.1086/153171
  8. https://doi.org/10.1088%2F0004-6256%2F137%2F6%2F4744
  9. doi:10.1086/190559
  10. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16965.x
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 https://doi.org/10.1051%2F0004-6361%2F201013993
  12. https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.00894
  13. 13.00 13.01 13.02 13.03 13.04 13.05 13.06 13.07 13.08 13.09 13.10 13.11 Template:Cite journal
  14. doi=10.1051/0004-6361/201322421
  15. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named mc
  16. doi=10.1088/0004-637X/703/1/420
  17. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named thomas
  18. Template:Cite journal
  19. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named josselin
  20. Template:Cite journal
  21. Template:Cite journal
  22. https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/abs/2013/06/aa20920-12/aa20920-12.html
  23. Template:Cite journal
  24. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-6256/135/4/1430/meta
  25. Template:Cite journal
  26. Template:Cite journal
  27. Template:Cite journal
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 28.3 doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200913771.
  29. Template:Cite journal
  30. Template:Cite journal
  31. Template:Cite journal
  32. Template:Cite web
  33. "Antares: Betelgeuse's Neglected Twin" Aavso.org.
  34. https://doi.org/10.1088%2F0004-637X%2F746%2F2%2F154
  35. Template:Cite journal
  36. Template:Cite journal
  37. 37.0 37.1 Template:Cite journal
  38. Template:Cite web
  39. Template:Cite journal
  40. Template:Cite journal
  41. https://doi.org/10.1086%2F176303
  42. https://doi.org/10.1051%2F0004-6361%3A20078306
  43. https://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1741/
  44. https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.06086
  45. http://www.newforestobservatory.com/2012/07/02/the-second-reddest-star-in-the-sky-119-tauri-ce-tauri/
  46. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-637X/778/2/109/meta
  47. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/2041-8205/734/1/L13/meta
  48. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa60c8/meta
  49. http://depts.washington.edu/naivpl/sites/default/files/hz.shtml
  50. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=10781
  51. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=6127
  52. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=9837
  53. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=2512
  54. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=10947
  55. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=9107
  56. http://www.eso.org/~mwittkow/publications/conferences/SPIECWo5491199.pdf
  57. http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-5?-out.add=.&-source=II/224/cadars&recno=10628
  58. Template:Cite web
  59. Template:Cite journal
  60. Template:Cite journal
  61. Template:Cite journal
  62. http://etacar.umn.edu/etainfo/basic/
  63. Gamma Crucis by Jim Kaler
  64. Template:Cite journal
  65. bibcode=1992A&AS...95..589H
  66. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE5K5FibSxk